Posts Tagged ‘decorah eagles’

On July 1, 2012, the oldest of the three 2012 Decorah Bald Eagles died tragically in an accident. The eaglet was only three months old, and was found electrocuted at the base of a power pole in Decorah, Iowa.

A small tribute seems hardly enough for this magnificent bird that we watched from the time it hatched to its first branching to its first flight.

Rest in Peace, D12.

Decorah Eagles – D12 has Fledged – Flown from Tree – 06-13-12

American Bald Eagle:

If you see a “web page not available” error screen on the videos, please refresh the page.

Decorah Bald Eagles Ustream Livecam:

http://www.ustream.tv/decoraheagles

The Livecam link:

http://www.ustream.tv/decoraheagles

This morning’s branching confirmation, where Eagle D12 goes to the Y-branch and back to the nest:

D12 on Y-branch with Mom, 6-9-2012:

The Decorah Bald Eagles are very close to being on the wing!Bald Eagle flying is a process with steps like exercising the wing muscles (wingercising). The eaglets wingercise at the edge of the nest cup. This process takes some time. At the same time, the flight feathers are developing. Next in the process is hovering and then branching, where the bird sort of hop-flys to a branch and back to the nest. What will happen next is that a puff of wind will catch them, and they will find themselves in flight.

This morning, a panner happened to be present to film the eagle D12 (the oldest of three) branching.

Raptor Resource Project states:

1
Questions of the Week
When will they fly?
Learning to fly is a process. They are currently wingercizing. This entails flapping their wings and hopping. Late in the wingercizing phase, a gust of wind will lift them accidentally, and they will hover over the nest because their muscles are strong enough to hold their wings in the correct position and their flight feathers are long enough to sustain the lift.
Branching comes after that. Branching is defined as a small hop and lift onto the closest branch. Unless there is a panner present at the time, we will not see this first very small journey away from the nest to the branch.
Fledge or first self-propelled flight away from and back to the nest tree comes last.
The whole process last 10-13 weeks.

Click here for Decorah Bald Eagles Live Cam.

Last night at midnight, an owl visited the nest quite suddenly. Mom and Dad were not amused, and they reacted with calls and posturing. Everyone in the nest is fine. This is not Mom and Dad’s first kick at the can (see next video depicting the same scenario last year):

Decorah Eagles Owl Intruder at Midnight 4-14-12 11:52pm CDT

This is not the first time. Last year, the owl intruder visited more than once. Here is a clip:

Decorah Eagle gets attacked by Owl Second night in a row

The Decorah Bald Eagles are back, and they are “heavy into courtship.”

Livecam link:

http://www.ustream.tv/decoraheagles

YouTube teaser:

http://www.youtube.com/user/ries96

 

Decorah Eagles 031 by lostntym

From lostntym

[Decorah Bald Eagle parent via flickr]

I do not know if you guys have seen this, but it is fascinating. The Raptor Research Project has a 24-hour ‘live-streaming’ camera on a Bald Eagle nest in Decorah, Iowa (northeast Iowa).

http://www.ustream.tv/decoraheagles

 

http://www.ustream.tv/flash/viewer.swf Live Streaming by Ustream.TV

 

Mom and Dad eagle were ‘married’ in 2007. The unbanded pair raised three groups of chicks prior to this brood, and all eight are now on the wing.

The family lives on private property about eighty feet above the ground, near a fish hatchery and a stream. They love sushi.

The nest is six feet across, four feet deep, and weighs about a thousand pounds, so it is about the size of a small, uh…dumpster.

On a different topic, my son said:

“…I typically don´t like using the word “amazing” when describing somewhere that I’ve visited, mainly because I think it´s cheesy and usually an over exaggeration…”

My apologies. The Decorah Eagles are…amazing.