These images are part of a set from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The images are posted under Creative Commons on flicker, with this statement:

Personal, educational and non-commercial use of digital images from the American Art Museum’s collection is permitted, with attribution to the Smithsonian American Art Museum, for all images unless otherwise noted. http://americanart.si.edu/collections/rights/

Marion Post Wolcott: Child in Doorway of Shack of Migrant Pickers and Packing House Workers, near Belle Glade, Florida, 1939
Marion Post Wolcott: Child in Doorway of Shack of Migrant Pickers and Packing House Workers, near Belle Glade, Florida, 1939

Marion Post Wolcott
Born: Montclair, New Jersey 1910
Died: Santa Barbara, California 1990
silver print on paper
sheet: 11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.6 cm.)
Smithsonian American Art Museum
Gift of Dr. John H. and Jann Arrington Wolcott

Marion Post Wolcott: Migrant family from Missouri camping out in cane brush. One woman said, "We ain't never lived like hogs before, but we sure does now." Canal Point, Florida, 1939

Marion Post Wolcott: Migrant family from Missouri camping out in cane brush. One woman said, “We ain’t never lived like hogs before, but we sure does now.” Canal Point, Florida, 1939

Marion Post Wolcott: Negro men and women working in a field. Bayou Bourbeaux Plantation. Natchitoches, Louisiana, 1940

Marion Post Wolcott: Negro men and women working in a field. Bayou Bourbeaux Plantation. Natchitoches, Louisiana, 1940

27-0637a

27-0637a

Millard Sheets: Tenement Flats, 1934

Millard Sheets: Tenement Flats, 1934

Tenement Flats, 1934
Millard Sheets, Born: Pomona, California 1907 Died: Gualala, California 1989
oil on canvas 40 1/4 x 50 1/4 in. (102.1 x 127.6 cm.)
Smithsonian American Art Museum
Transfer from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service 1965.18.48

Marion Post Wolcott: Farmers Sleeping in a "white" camp room in a warehouse. They often must remain several days before their tobacco is sold. Durham, North Carolina, 1939

Marion Post Wolcott: Farmers Sleeping in a “white” camp room in a warehouse. They often must remain several days before their tobacco is sold. Durham, North Carolina, 1939

note: This post was inspired by my mother, who lived through the depression. She was born on a farm in Missouri in 1924, and left home at age 12 to pursue an education and teach. I am hoping to work with her, in the months to come, and share some of her amazing story here.

cross posted at Firedoglake.com/MyFDL.

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